Beachcombing on the Hidden Coast

Beachcombing on the Hidden Coast; a favorite pastime for locals and tourists alike, has been going on for as long as things have been washing up! On the Washington Coast we have some great examples of salvaging items from the beach such as Dorothy Anderson’s Tourist Harbor. Crafted from reclaimed shipwreck and beach finds, starting with her own cabin in 1929 Dorothy built a collection of tiny cabins for tourists to rent. And long before Dorothy, there were indigenous tribes and settlers scouring the vast expanse of sand from along the whole Hidden Coast Scenic Byway from what’s now Ocean Shores north to Taholah.  Local Finds: Japan Tsunami (2011) Image from Washington.EDU On March 11, 2011 a tsunami hit the…

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Relocating to the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway – What you Need to Know

After relocating to the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway, two years ago (from Tacoma) we’ve learned a lot about the area, and especially what it’s like to live and run a business here. As we grind through our first Covid-19 summer on the Washington Coast, it’s abundantly clear that lots of folks are purchasing property out here; whether it’s buying for recreation or permanent relocation, remains to be seen. Of course when you come out for a visit it seems all dreamy and wonderful to live at the beach but before you jump ship, you might want to consider some nuances you’ll likely have to adjust to. Things to Know about Relocating to the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway: 1. It’s a…

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Dorothy Anderson Cabin, The Story of a Girl Picker

A little backstory on the historic Dorothy Anderson cabin at Seabrook. Dorothy Antonnette Anderson In 1926, at the age of 19, Dorothy Antonnette Anderson, an immigrant from Nessa, Norway, along with the thousands of other city dwellers, poured into towns along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway to take a break from the hustle and bustle. Many traveled by train from Seattle to Hoquiam and on to Moclips and Pacific Beach. Others traversed miles on unpaved roads in a Model-T or perhaps a newly minted Model-A, all in the name of rest and relaxation on the Ocean’s edge.  “On the Sands of the Pacific, 1914 Moclips, Wash.” (Image from Museum of the North Beach Collection) “Merchants Picnic at Moclips Wash.” 1910…

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Antique Shops and Thrift Stores on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway

Not sure about you, but when I leave town a favorite pastime is going to local antique shops and thrift stores. Big surprise, I know. 🙂 And to find them, I do exactly what you do… Google Search. The problem with that is a lot of times all sorts of big travel websites come up; Yelp, Travelocity, and others with their list of top 10’s and so often shops are left off the list because clearly, the person writing isn’t from the area. As a local and an antique shop owner, I’ve visited all of these and here’s what you can expect from antique shops and thrift stores on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway. (Plus a couple extras in Aberdeen…

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Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast in the 1930’s; an Oral History

Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway in the 1930’s; a Personal Story In April 1990, Harriet Baller, a 48-year resident of Moclips wrote about the trials and tribulations of clam digging on the coast. Upon her death at the age of 90, her stories were donated to the Museum of the North Beach where they “live to tell” along with other local oral and written histories. Harriet Baller (1915 – 2006) Born on February 1, 1915 in Glendive, Montana, by age 13 Harriet and her family moved to Western Washington where her father worked as a carpenter in Queets and then Hoquiam. After graduating from Hoquiam High School in 1933, Harriet worked at the local Kress department store…

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