Beachcombing on the Hidden Coast

Beachcombing on the Hidden Coast; a favorite pastime for locals and tourists alike, has been going on for as long as things have been washing up! On the Washington Coast we have some great examples of salvaging items from the beach such as Dorothy Anderson’s Tourist Harbor. Crafted from reclaimed shipwreck and beach finds, starting with her own cabin in 1929 Dorothy built a collection of tiny cabins for tourists to rent. And long before Dorothy, there were indigenous tribes and settlers scouring the vast expanse of sand from along the whole Hidden Coast Scenic Byway from what’s now Ocean Shores north to Taholah.  Local Finds: Japan Tsunami (2011) Image from Washington.EDU On March 11, 2011 a tsunami hit the…

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Dorothy Anderson Cabin, The Story of a Girl Picker

A little backstory on the historic Dorothy Anderson cabin at Seabrook. Dorothy Antonnette Anderson In 1926, at the age of 19, Dorothy Antonnette Anderson, an immigrant from Nessa, Norway, along with the thousands of other city dwellers, poured into towns along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway to take a break from the hustle and bustle. Many traveled by train from Seattle to Hoquiam and on to Moclips and Pacific Beach. Others traversed miles on unpaved roads in a Model-T or perhaps a newly minted Model-A, all in the name of rest and relaxation on the Ocean’s edge.  “On the Sands of the Pacific, 1914 Moclips, Wash.” (Image from Museum of the North Beach Collection) “Merchants Picnic at Moclips Wash.” 1910…

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Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast in the 1930’s; an Oral History

Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway in the 1930’s; a Personal Story In April 1990, Harriet Baller, a 48-year resident of Moclips wrote about the trials and tribulations of clamming digging on the coast. Upon her death at the age of 90, her stories were donated to the Museum of the North Beach where they “live to tell” along with other local oral and written histories. Harriet Baller (1915 – 2006) Born on February 1, 1915 in Glendive, Montana, by age 13 Harriet and her family moved to Western Washington where her father worked as a carpenter in Queets and then Hoquiam. After graduating from Hoquiam High School in 1933, Harriet worked at the local Kress department store…

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Ocean Shores Fog Festival 1973

We live at the end of the USA, on the Washington Coast, where things have always been drastically different than city life on the I-5 corridor. Born out of a desire for fun, just a few decades ago, Ocean Shores was a party town complete with a resident shipwreck (the SS Catala), celebrities (Pat Boone, Ginny Simms), and the premier “maker of fun,” Bob Ward. Bob was a PR guy from Seattle recruited to Ocean Shores to promote lot sales for the original development group. A master at his craft, not only did Bob create the foundational fun of this little hamlet by the sea, he started its first newspaper, the Ocean Observer. Here’s a tribute to Bob’s 1973 Ocean…

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Judy McVay the Ultimate (Wood Carved) Sign

To say that pulling a 16-foot wood carved sign from the attic of an old service station in Copalis Beach took the top spot on my ‘best of’ list, is an understatement. It did so much more; fed my obsession with Washington State history, my love of forestry, brought new friends and family into my life, and seeded a movement. Thank you, Judy McVay! But First… Used Car Salesman Leo A car guy from way back, Leo owned dealerships on South Tacoma Way (auto row) as well as a couple at the beach including this one, across from Copalis Beach Grocery. We met in the summer of 2018 when Leo’s building was up for sale. His dream was to use…

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