Dead Crabs all Over the Beach at Pacific Beach & Moclips

All sorts of people wander into the shop on any given day and many of them ask interesting questions and we get into conversations about history, pickin‘ and the North Beach. But recently I was asked an odd question and surprisingly — I knew the answer! A couple came, shopped around and at checkout they asked, “How come there are so many dead crabs all over the beach?” I explained they weren’t dead, it was molting season and the little critters literally walk out of their shell, leaving it behind. They laughed but had never heard of or seen that before. photo courtesy of Chinook Observer For those who’ve never heard about molting crabs, it’s probably shocking to see what…

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Antique Shops and Thrift Stores on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway

Not sure about you, but when I leave town a favorite pastime is going to local antique shops and thrift stores. Big surprise, I know. 🙂 And to find them, I do exactly what you do… Google Search. The problem with that is a lot of times all sorts of big travel websites come up; Yelp, Travelocity, and others with their list of top 10’s and so often shops are left off the list because clearly, the person writing isn’t from the area. As a local and an antique shop owner, I’ve visited all of these and here’s what you can expect from antique shops and thrift stores on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway. (Plus a couple extras in Aberdeen…

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Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast in the 1930’s; an Oral History

Clam Digging on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway in the 1930’s; a Personal Story In April 1990, Harriet Baller, a 48-year resident of Moclips wrote about the trials and tribulations of clamming digging on the coast. Upon her death at the age of 90, her stories were donated to the Museum of the North Beach where they “live to tell” along with other local oral and written histories. Harriet Baller (1915 – 2006) Born on February 1, 1915 in Glendive, Montana, by age 13 Harriet and her family moved to Western Washington where her father worked as a carpenter in Queets and then Hoquiam. After graduating from Hoquiam High School in 1933, Harriet worked at the local Kress department store…

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